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Vn84.1 Go Cart Demon; Knock-Knock Jokes 9/5/77

The third-floor tenant in our landlord’s mansion was moving out
today. Robby and Miriam went to help. One comment of Miriam’s came
floating up from the court yard. When she chanced upon a collection
of records brought down in a wooden case, Miriam said, “Hey, Robby,
let’s ask Bill if we can have that box. If we get our wheels, it’s
just what we need for our go cart.” (Cf. Vignette 50). From this
comment, with the availability of ‘found’ material now rendering less
than fantastic for Miriam the construction of a real go cart, I see
Miriam thinking more in the style of a bricoleur than does Robby on
this project. (Recall his engineer-like inclination to draw up a materials
list for purchases to be made at the lumber yard.)

On this day, the children also encountered a book about which we
have heard since — a book of knock-knock jokes. Robby introduced this:

Jokester

Knock knock.
Victim

Who’s there?
Jokester

Robin.
Victim

Robin who?
Jokester

Robbin’ you. Gimme your wallet.

Miriam recalled a second:

Jokester

Knock knock.
Victim

Who’s there?
Jokester

Ivanitch.
Victim

Ivanitch who?
Jokester

I’ve an itch I can’t scratch.

While this theme was before us, Miriam recalled a third joke:

Jokester

Knock knock.
Victim

Who’s there?
Jokester

Irish.
Victim

Irish who?
Jokester

I rish I never said “Knock knock.”

Relevance
The first incident contrasts Miriam’s idea of acquiring materials
for the go cart project with Robby’s. The second series of jokes —
the first 2 coming from a book I hadn’t seen and the third from a TV
commercial I did not watch indicate how rapidly Miriam’s perimeter of
experience is expanding beyond the reach of my knowledge. I believe
it is still possible to trace the sources of Miriam’s knowledge but
feel keenly how important it is that she has become accustomed to
discuss her ideas, her thought processes, and their sources.

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