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Vn01701

Vn017A

Arithmetic Ripples

5/28/77


After the session in which I introduced Miriam to adding large numbers (see Home Session 4, 5/28), passing Miriam’s room I noticed in her open loose-leaf book a page of computation. Miriam later gave it to me and I include it as Addendum 17 – 1.

Note that the written form of the equations mimics the horizontal form used in our introduction (see addendum 1 in Home Session 4). Additionally, Miriam attempted here a subtraction with large numbers (i.e. 80 – 7 = 73), her suggestion which I turned down during Home Session 4. Place value, as a topic of interest to Miriam, appears not only in her large numbers, but also in the directly contrasting sums: 11 + 1 = 12 and 1 + 1 = 2.

When she gave me the page, Miriam explained her attempt to subtract 7 from 1; how 1 minus 1 was zero and 1 minus 7 was zero. I expect she will conceive of the negative integers soon.

Relevance

These incidents document the ways computation crops up in Miriam’s world.

Addendum 17-1

ADDENDUM 17-1

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Vn01703

Vn01703

Arithmetic Ripples

6/1/77


Miriam was playing in the kitchen with Scurry this morning. Gretchen and I were discussing some topic, and I mentioned a division problem. Miriam piped up, “I can divide, Daddy. . . . 8 divided by 8 is 1.”

I congratulated her on her prowess. For Miriam the formula she recited constitutes division. The division problem is the one I executed in playing Dr. World’s computer game (in Home Session 5, 5/30). Despite her ability to divide sets concretely (see Miriam at 6: Arithmetic), Miriam does not appear to associate dividing with “division,” a process for which she has, I believe, this one example.

Relevance

These incidents document the ways computation crops up in Miriam’s world.

Vn02301

Vignette 23.1

Arithmetic Ripples

6/5 & 11/77


Miriam does not yet recognize the existence of negative numbers. The typical problem this causes her was shown as we rode home from buying a Sunday paper (the children go with me to buy chewing gum). Miriam was discussing making change with Robby. She knew that paying for a 15¢ pack of gum with a quarter involved a ‘take-away’ problem. She asked Robby (getting the formulation backwards):

Miriam How much is 15 take away 25?
Robby 10.
Miriam That’s not right. I made a mistake. I said 15 take away 25.
Robby Minus 10, like 10 below (cf. Protocol from the series on Robby’s arithmetic development).
Bob Does that make any sense to you, Miriam?
Miriam No. You can’t do that. That’s like 1000 take away 7000. You can’t do it.
Robby 6000 below.
Bob Does that make any sense to you?
Miriam No.

6/11 Today was one of those terrible days. Gretchen and I had bad headaches. The weather was foul, rain for two days running when the forecast had been for a bright weekend. The children played inside all day; they played chase with the dog. And finally, Miriam is mad at me.

Late in the afternoon, she came to me: “Daddy, I’m mad at you for two reasons. You didn’t do any arithmetic with me today, and you told me it was going to be sunny.” I promised to do some adding (she said then both adding and subtracting) on the morrow and disclaimed all responsibility for the weather.

A little later, Miriam found Robby willing to talk about arithmetic. The two entered our reading alcove with this conversation:

Miriam 10 times 10 is 35.
Robby No, Miriam (counting on his fingers), ten 10’s are a hundred. Isn’t that right, Mommy? (Gretchen confirmed his result).
Miriam It can’t be. 5 times 5 is 25, so 10 times 10 is 35.

As Robby went on to other affairs, Miriam asked me, isn’t that a big number? I can add three thousand and thirty five (cf. Vignette 17, 5/30). Upon my responding that the number was something like that, she suggested we look in my notebook. We found there the number 3132 as an addend (cf. Home Session 4). I promised that she could learn to add some more big numbers.

Relevance

These three incidents point to three separate themes that will be developed in future arithmetic sessions with Miriam. I intend to confront her, gradually, with situations which will require her inventing the negative integers. I intend to introduce her to ‘times’ as counting in non-unary increments. I intend to reveal to her that what she has learned of adding already (in Home Sessions 4 and 6) permits her to add all big numbers.

Vn02401

Vn024.01

Writing Stories


Robby called me from Miriam’s bedroom: “Dad, come see the puppet show.” They have played with, even made, hand puppets for a while and enjoy giving shows — whose typical script has been, “Hello, my name is Owl. Goodbye.” I was in high spirits after a very successful arithmetic session with Miriam (see Home Session 7). Sucker that I am, I came along. Walking through the door, I found the children were playing “Ambush” — both lying under covers on the top bunk and crying “BAM BAM” as I walked through the door. Riotous laughter.
Suffering only flesh wounds, I managed to return their fire, then said I thought it was a dirty trick for them to call me to see a puppet show, then shoot me. Miriam responded, “This was our puppet show —

Once upon a time,
There were two guns.
Bang. Bang.
The end.

Her joke was a spontaneous expression of the WRITER program’s story format. Her use of it in this explanatory way shows her recognition that it is a shared model of what a story structure is.

The puppet-show play continued; the children agreed to put on a real puppet show. I had to leave the bedroom, and when ready, they summoned the audience with toots on a toy horn.

Act I The fierce Owl (Robby) swooped down and pounced upon the dancing ballerina (Miriam’s doll).,
Act II The fierce Owl, joined by Eeyore, climbed a tree, and both pounced upon whom? The ballerina had become a teacher and had to be pounced upon because the owl and donkey didn’t want to go to school.
Act III The owl and donkey climbed a tree whence better to pounce upon the teacher, now riding upon two toy horses because of injuries received in act II. (Miriam plays such an action herself because she is so big and her favorite toy horses so small). Miriam argued that it was O.K. for Robby to pounce upon the teacher, but he shouldn’t bite “little horsey.”
Act IVThe horns again called me into the room. “BAM BAM BAM” — ambushed again.

When I had resettled in the reading alcove of my bedroom, the children rushed upon me with cried of “Act V.” We engaged in a general rough house and pillow fight.

Vn02901

Vn029.01 Making Puzzles 6/18/77


Vn29-1

Vn29-2 Addendum1

Vn29-3 Addendum2

Vn06101

Vn61.1 Tic Tac Toe (5) 8/10/77

This material shows Miriam accepting instruction at corner opening play through a process of “turning the tables” on me after my exemplary victory. (The data were transcribed as Home Session 15.) A corner opening in tic-tac-toe is the strategy of choice, since its use nearly guarantees victory for the player moving first. Nonetheless, because it is possible to lose through failing to recognize opportunities or through one tie-forcing response by the second player, the power of the corner opening is not excessively obvious.

At the beginning of our play I introduced to Miriam as an extension of “ways to win” the notion of “chances to win.” You have a “chance to win” when you have only a single marker in a particular line and there is no blocking marker. The first game, wherein Miriam moved first, was a tie of the center-opening/corner-response sort. It was during the execution of this game that the “chances to win” terminology was introduced. At the beginning of game 2, I proposed teaching Miriam a good trick. Since the gambit begins with a corner opening, Miriam believed and asserted that she already knew it. She is aware of at least three corner-opening games:

A.      1 |  C  |  3         1 |  B  | 2         1 |  3  | C    

B.        |  A  | 4            |  3  | D         D |  A  | 5   

C.      B |     |  2         C |  4  | A         4 |  B  | 2 

The A game represents Miriam’s good trick, and B and C represent ways of blocking A which she can’t circumvent. In the games that follow where my move is first, Miriam attempted 3 different responses to my corner opening. In the other games, she “turns the tables” on me by using my play as a model to defeat me in turn.

Game 2: Bob moves first (numbers)

         1 | C  | 3    
           | B  | 4    
         A |    | 2  

Miriam makes move A at my direction and after my move 3, recognizes not only that I have 2 ways to win but also that A has no chances and B 2 chances to win.

Game 3: Miriam moves first (letters)

         A | 3  | C    
           | 2  | D    
         1 |    | B 

Miriam here follows my advice to “turn the tables” on me by employing the same good trick (move 2 after response A to opening 1). During her role switch in applying this strategy, Miriam also switched from using X symbols as markers (which she had done in game 2) to literally copying the numbers I had used in that game (cf. games 2 and 3 in Addendum 61 – 1).

Game 4: Miriam moves first (letters)

	 A |    | 1    
         D | 2  |       
  	 C | 3  | B 

Miriam moves first (out of turn) at my request to confront the challenge of turning the tables despite my choosing the corner response opposite to that of game 3. I asked her opinion:

Bob Is moving here [upper right corner] the same or different from moving there [lower left corner]?
Miriam Different.
Bob Can you play the same game even though I’ve moved in the opposite corner.
Miriam I think I can.

As we continue, Miriam comments, “I’m playing the same trick on you.” Miriam again uses numbers for her markers but disguises the copying by using numbers (9, 6, 5, 10) different from those I had used in game 2. After commenting that move 2 was a forced move as is move C, I emphasize that what is most important to see is that the single move C converts 2 chances to win into 2 ways to win.

Game 5: Bob moves first (numbers)

	 1 | 4  | 3    
	 B | C  |      
  	 2 |    | A  

I warn Miriam after move 1 that I will probably beat her. She believes she can frustrate my plan by making move A (notice in the typical and familiar game B the outcome was a tie).

Bob In game 5 I am probably going to beat you —
Miriam Yeah.
Bob If you move where I tell you the first time, and after that —
Miriam I might not move where you tell me [laughing, she moves A; I had wanted her to move to the middle of the right column].
Bob Do you think I can beat you after that move?
Miriam Yeah [Miriam has not seen this game before, to my knowledge].
Bob I can. I will show you how.

After Miriam made her forced move B, I described my deciding where to move in terms of where I had chances to win and looking for a move where 2 chances to win come together. This game is one where selecting a usually valuable move (the center square) is not the optimal strategy.

Bob I can’t win this way [the 1 – 2 line is blocked by B]. I have a chance to win this way [in the row from number 1]. Do I have another chance anywhere? . . . Yes, I have a chance from 2 up through the center. And I have a chance along the top. So if I put my number 3 where the two chances come together, what do I get?
Miriam Two ways to win?
Bob That’s right, sweety.

Game 6: Miriam moves first (letters)

	 A | D | C    
	 2 | 3 |       
  	 B |   | 1 

Miriam turns the tables on me successfully. The symbols she used in the actual game show her slipping over into direct copying of my previous game.

Game 7: Bob moves first (numbers)

	 1 |    | C    
	 B | 3  | A    
  	 2 | D  | 4 

Although I wanted her to go first (for another variation on game 6), Miriam insisted that I go first because it was my turn. After Miriam’s response A to the corner opening I proceeded, describing my reasoning at each step.

Bob I put my 2 here. Now watch. You have a forced move, don’t you [between 1 and 2].
Miriam Uh-huh [moves B].
Bob What chances to win do I have? I have one from the 1 along the top. I have one from the 2 along the bottom.
Miriam Two.
Bob I have one from the 2 through the center. . . but. . . I also have a forced move in the center. Right? . . . So I have to go in the center. But when I go in the center, how many ways to win will I have?
Miriam One?
Bob Watch. I have a way to win from the 2 and a way to win from the 1.

At this point Miriam confided to me that she would try to get Robby to move where she had placed her A, then she would make another move and try this trick on him.

I attempted to review with Miriam all the possible responses to corner openings, but she was tired and inattentive, and the session ended.

Relevance
This vignette describes my introducing to Miriam the idea of “chances to win,” seeing the forking move as placing a marker where chances to win intersect. The method was that of her “turning the tables” on me, i. e. using a tactic I showed as effective against me.

Addendum 61-1

from Home Session 15

Vn 61-1 Addendum from Home Session 15

Vn08901

Vn89.1 The Ten in Fourteen 9/7-10/77

9/7 After considerable confusion at the beginning of yesterday’s arith-
metic work (Home Session 18, 9/6/77), in a reprise after games of Tic
Tac Toe, I was able to explain ‘carrying’ to Miriam in a manner access-
ible to her. I cited a recent comment of hers while doing mental arith-
metic that “there’s a ten in the number 14.” This point of connection
permitted the only explication of carrying so far that has been able to
compete with Miriam’s “reduction-to-9’s” procedure.

Where did this reference “there’s a 10 in the 14” come from? I
examined recent vignettes and found no reference to it. Since I could
recall no more detail, this morning I put the question to Miriam. I
noted it might have come up the last time we rode to MIT in the Audi
(I vaguely remember a discussion in such a setting about the sum of
170 and 87). Miriam said, “I remember. It was at dinner a day or two
ago. Robby asked how much was 30 and 14, so I said it was 44, ’cause
there was a 10 in the 14; that made it 40, plus 4.”

9/8 Before Miriam went off to school this morning, I asked her if she
could still see the 10 in 14 and the 20 in 27. She apparently under-
stood and said yes. I reminded her that reducing to 9’s was a buggy
procedure for carrying.

9/10 While typing a fair copy of the work in Home Session 14 (July 31),
Gretchen found the reference I sought to Miriam’s explanation of there
being a 10 in 14: Episode I, page 2.

Relevance
These notes mark the reappearance of the idea of being able to see
a 10 in 14. When I, attempting to find the specific reference of
Miriam’s first using the phrase, ask her about it, she reconstructs for
me an incident which seems plausible enough but is probably entirely
a fabrication.