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Archive with last of tag-string Imp

3V0472.1

3V0472.01 Doing “Headstands” (5/9/79)

Once she started toddling about, Peggy began “headstands,” i.e. with
her feet firmly planted wide apart, she brings her head and hands down
to the floor and peers between her legs. Peggy has done this several
times when I was nearby and, catching my eye, laughed gleefully as if
this were some sort of a joke (Perhaps in the sense that peek-a-boo is a
joke?). This is a common act among babies. What does it signify ?

3V0544.1

3V0544.01 “reading” Scientific American: 07/20/79

Since Miriam offered to “read the book” (Madeline), Peggy has pestered
us to read to her. The selection is surprising. Today she came
careening through the gallery pass-way waving a Scientific American
and saying distinctly (to herself — she was nowhere near me yet)
[read].

We did, after lunch, “read” that magazine. We would turn pages and
make noises of amazement at the pictures. Peggy returned repeatedly
to pictures of things she could recognize, e.g. cars. The objects
dominating advertisements were cars, cameras, and alcohol (whiskey,
gin, etc.). They got most of her attention, but she also examined
diagrams and drawings supporting text articles.

I got tired of this exercise and directed our attention to Miriam’s
illustrated tales of Peter Rabbit. Peggy was interested in the drawings,
but not so clearly so much as in the photographs of recognizable
objects, such as the cars.

3V0555.1

3V0555.01 [Car, car, go, go]: (07/31/79)

I was taking Peggy and Scurry for a walk. I carried Peggy out to the
garage and seated her in the stroller. Peggy waved her hand around and
cried, “Ca’, ca’, go ca’,” indicating she wanted to go for a ride. She has
often said “Ca'” under those circumstances, but never before “Go ca’.”
Walking up the street we came to a place where there are dogs on both
sides, a sheltie and a beagle. Whenever we pass, the sheltie growls at us
and the beagle barks. Neither dog happened to be outside. Peggy
looked from one side to the other, the remarked inquiringly, “Vava’.”
She obviously expected those dogs and wanted to know where they
were. Gretchen.

3V1120.2

3V112002 Squirting (skunks; rabbits squirt with their ears.) (2/15/81)

Peggy has a skunk… it attacks other animals by SQUIRTING them with its tail. (Does this show the influences of Robby, Miriam ?) Squirting is NOT limited to the skunk. Most other animals also squirt from tails. An exception is the rabbit. It has a button tail — so it squirts with its EARS ! !

I will try to describe other such scripts as I observe them. The general impression I have is that the behavior in all these games has roots in such simple scripts or in surface features of the particular toys — I have no examples at hand. I need to note one when next observed.

Vn01102

Vn011.02

Making Beaded Bracelets

5/23/77


In our work at Logo, Miriam has recently tended to not do what I tell her. That’s too strong a statement. When I give Miriam advice, for example, that a certain distance is probably a hundred forty turtle steps, Miriam specifically commands the turtle with some similar but different operand, e.g. FD 130.

Miriam was unhappy with the bracelet she made for Kim and/or Sue (her student teachers at Baldwin, who are leaving on Wednesday). I took the liberty of arranging her beads in a bracelet thus:
2 red (R) 2 blue (B) 2 black (Bl) 6 orange (O)
7 brown (Br)


Br – O – Bl – Br – O – B – Br – O – R –
Br
Br – O – Bl – Br – O – B – Br – O – R –

triplets with a single varying member and the extra bead in the center.

Later, I showed this new bracelet to Miriam and told her I thought I had made a pretty pattern. She untied the knot and removed the string, saying she would make her own pretty pattern. As Miriam proceeded to sort the beads by color, I pointed out a major difficulty. There was one extra brown bead. Miriam put one brown bead on the string. I asked if I could give her a hint. She was willing. “A good trick when you have an even number of beads is to put one of the same kind on at each end of the string and push them to the middle.” Miriam took this advice and produced the following string with which she is quite pleased:


R – Br – O – Br – O – Br – B – Bl – O –
Br
R – Br – O – Br – O – Br – B – Bl – O –