Skip to content
Archive with last of tag-string Q23

Vn10401

Vn104.1 Back to School 10/14/77

During the last days of our project experiments, I promised Miriam
to visit her first grade class as I had visited in kindergarten. I had
the mistaken impression that Miriam had arranged my visit with Ms.
Fieman. The oversight proved to be no problem, for despite my beard
and over-size frame I blended in well with the group of children.

It was “Read me this, read me that. Do you know my name?” David
B. said, “I remember you. Last year you came and we set up that thing
from the ceiling.” His reference was to a 3 string pulley I rigged in
the spring which enable the children to hoist heavy weights, their
desks (!) and each other (!!) a few feet off the floor. One of the
other boys (was it John?) asked if I still had that machine for making
electricity. Curtis brought over a soma cube and the children squabbled
over it. Miriam did not have a chance to work on the puzzle for any time
with 5 classmates each wanting a turn. Meg and Laurie Ann sat with me
and Miriam before the class split into two groups — one headed for the
library, the other for an introduction to the class’ activities for the
day.

The librarian attempted to introduce to the children the distinction
between factual and fictional writing. It is possible my presence, my
sitting on the floor with the children, caused her some unusual confusion.
Nonetheless, it appeared that she neither had articulated for herself
any consistent set of criteria nor had any good language for communicating
her ideas to the children.

Once again in class, Miriam took up the writing activity. Curtis
and I joined her. The task was one of sentence completion: e.g. “With
my eyes I can see ________.” The children’s task is to write a description
and draw a picture of some appropriate object. Miriam chose to spell
and draw flowers. Her other senses led her to taste corn on the cob and
ice cream; to feel fuzzy things (here Scurry was the exemplar); and to
hear a song — which she represented by a person singing the complete
text of “Drive, drive, drive your car, gently down the street” as sung
by Don Music on Sesame Street.

After Miriam’s work was approved, we had a few minutes to play
before I left. She suggested checkers. Lately we have been playing
variations of the standard game. We tried a 4×4 board (played with 2
checkers on each side) and a 6×6 board (played with 6 checkers on each
side). The board fell to the floor while still folded but with squares
showing. I suggested we play ‘half a game’ of checkers. (The board
was thus 4×8 and played with 6 checkers on each side). We played 3
games. Miriam’s friends came crowding around and all wanted their turns.
But I did have to leave and suggested Miriam could play ‘half a game’
with them.

Relevance
These notes try to capture both the continuity and change of Miriam’s
kindergarten and first grade. There is more structure in that the children
cycle through a set of selected activities (of such a sort that they
could be interesting). The children can get some play time by finishing
their work quickly. Ms. Fieman is good with the children and flexible
enough to let a parent visit with insufficient notice. Miriam seems
comfortable in the situation and enjoys school to the extent that she
chooses to attend even if she feels unwell.

Vn11201

Vn112.1 How Her Teacher Sees Miriam 12/7/77

Miriam’s teacher, Sue, sees her as a special child in several ways.
Her surprise at Miriam’s easy solution of class inclusion problems (cf.
Vignette 90, Meeting Miriam’s Teacher) shows she had reason outside of
anything I told her in our first meeting. She learned of Miriam’s continuing
work at the Logo project and was favorably impressed by our links
with the now-respectable scientist Piaget. Thus Miriam appears special
by developmental progress for her age and by the experience of her ongoing
engagement in a serious study.

As The Intimate Study concluded, the children asked if they could
bring their classmates over to visit Logo. I agreed to help them work
that out if they wanted to, on condition that a few children came at one
time and that Robby and Miriam be the ones who ran the show. Both accepted
this scenario as the best one. Robby suggested that their teachers
be first to visit (I don’t know why). Miriam was not keen on the idea
but didn’t argue enough to undermine Robby’s support of the plan. About
the middle of November, the two teachers spent approximately 2 hours at
Logo. The children showed off their computer pictures and their desks,
then explained their work to the teachers. I stayed in the background
as much as possible. Both wanted to play Wumpus, but because this was
confusing to their teachers, they showed them SHOOT and its variations,
explaining the primitives and exhibiting the arithmetic tasks the game
involved them in. Otherwork included the use of POLYSPI and INSPI,
drawings, and a text manipulation work. I believe the teachers were
impressed by the work and the children’s command of it. Sue’s note (see
Addendum 112 – 1) witnesses her response.

Yesterday Gretchen met with Sue for an evaluation conference. (The
report is attached as Addendum 112 – 2, 3, and 4). I was unable to attend
the meeting, but Gretchen recalls these comments:

- Miriam gets a great deal of pleasure from seeing and playing with 
     her school friends.
- Miriam always did her work with a great deal of attention to detail, even
     if she was merely drawing to fill in time between organizeed activities.
- Miriam didn't copy from other people, either to get directions 
     for what she should be doing or to get an idea.
- Miriam cooperated and worked well with her classmates, but not 
     merely that. She tried to help them and was able to do so.
- Miriam seemed to enjoy solving problems. Her focus was not on getting 
     the answer; she seemed to enjoy the process of working out problems, 
     to take pleasure in the process more than in the result.

Relevance
These notes record a view of Miriam independent from mine.

Addendum 112-1

Note from Miriam’s Teacher

Vn 112-1 Teacher note

Addendum 112-2

Conference Report, page 1

Vn 112-2 Conference report, pg 1

Addendum 112-3

Conference Report, page 2

Vn 112-3 Conference report, pg 2

Addendum 112-4

Conference Report, page 3

Vn 112-4 Conference report, pg 3

Vn11401

Vn114.1 The Game Goes Ever On 12/28 & 29/77

Relevance

In the first incident, Miriam invents the idea of opening advantage for “Tic Tac Toe two in a row.” I believe this is connected to her introduction to Hexapawn (a pawn capture gain played on a 3×3 board) as a reduced form of chess, and my invention of “half a game” of checkers as a reduced form. This invention of Miriam’s is a significant advance whose development I will follow in its application to Tic Tac Toe Three in a Row (cf. Home Session 20, Tic Tac Toe Finale).

Miriam’s defeating the Children’s Museum computer brings her back as master to her point of engagement with the game.

Vignette 114, page 1, scanned from Original Fair Copy

(click on the image to englarge it; back arrow to return here.)
Vn 114-1 Scanned Original Fair Copy

Vignette 114, page 2, scanned from Original Fair Copy

Vn 114-2 Scanned Original Fair Copy