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P113

Peggy Study, Panel P113

Themes: Language Development, Object Exploration, Social interactions
Source: (Lawler); date: 3/23/1980

Title:
Text commentary: These clips have grainy video; this may be one of those dark videos brightened during digitizing



P113A “We Play Letters”, 2mb


P113B1 Standard Objects, 16mb


P113B2 Standard Objects, 13mb


P113B3 Standard Objects, 22mb


P113C “Where Mommy?”, 7mb


P113D1 Play Doggies, 22mb


P113D2 Play Doggies, 22mb


P113E Letter Desk, 17mb


P113F Play with Animals, 15mb


P113G Cat in the Hat, 21mb

P118

Peggy Study, Panel P118

Themes: Language Development, Object Exploration, Social Interaction
Source: (Lawler); date: 4/27/1980

Title:
Text commentary: These clips begin with Peggy rehearsing her early form of knock-knock jokes.



P118A1 Bag of Blocks, 20mb


P118A2 Bag of Blocks, 20mb


P118B1 Toy People & Blocks, 17mb


P118B2 Toy People & Blocks, 17mb


P118C Letter Desk, 13mb


P118D1 Standard Objects, 16mb


P118D2 Standard Objects, 20mb


P118E Standard Objects, with Miriam, 21mb


P118F Pokey Little Puppy, 3mb

P146G



P146G: Nesting Boxes and Cups 29mb

P146G Clip Notes

Notes: 6:25 by Analyst: News, 7/03/2013; P146GdetailsA, 10/12/13; P146GdetailsEF, 10/12/13; P146GdetailsH, 10/12/13;
Setting,Props Cedar Hall, Family Room: Nesting Boxes as well as Nesting Cups
Actors,Aims Peggy and Bob; GPL on camera.
Episode A:

Starts with Peg completing asssembly of nesting cups.
Bob: “Good for you! You did it again.” Peg: “Yep.”
Peg: pours out the cups onto the floor to repeat her performance and Bob interrupts, challenging her with with a “harder” problem if she is willing.
Bob: walks off camera to get the nesting boxes; her glance follows him, a look of uncertainty on her face.
Bob: puts down the boxes, asking “Do you think you can do it with these?”
Peg responds confidently “Oh yeah. I can do it with those.”
Bob: I don’t believe it.” Peg continues organizing the cups for stacking. Bob: interrupts
Episode B:

Bob: “Could you turn around this way, Peggy?” Then he collects all the cups. She moves, but not as he wanted, so he taps on the floor and says, “Sit over here.” She does then starts drawing the cups to her.
Episode C:

Peg: says “******” expressing an intention to asssembly all the cups, and then proceeds to do so, commenting on her actions / thinking out loud. She starts saying “No,” when running into an insertion block, and then proceeds directly to remove the blocking cup to make room for the candidate in her hands.
Bob: notes she got “a whole lot of yesses there and hardly any ‘no’s’.”
Episode D:

Bob: pushes forward the nesting boxes, in various orientations and positions, “Do you think you can make these go together ?” As she leans over to the boxes, he removes the cups “I’ll get these out of your way” and Peg expresses objection but no verbal protest.
Bob: says I’ll give them back in a little bit, OK?”
Episode E:
at 2:0
Peg: Picks up the smallest box and inserts it into the large box (at 2:0), saying “You go like this-a-way.” picking up the medium size box. She sees the small box blocking and removes it and tries inserting the medium box in the large one in an off-orientation and without aligning the corners.
Peg: Then says “you gotta play those a little bit,” while rotating the medium box on top of the large one.
Peg: “There’s it fit” and let’s it down.
Episode F:
at 2:10
Immediately picking up the small box (at 2:10) she changes her plan, moving to insert the assembled boxes into the largest one — whose orientation she needs to change and does so with one hand while holding the other boxes with the other. She gets it in directly, then turns to and picks up the smallest box, inserts it in the stack and says, “I did it.”
Bob: “I didn’t think you could do it.” GPL: “Wow!”
Episode G:
at 2:24
Bob: returns the collection of nesting cups to P. (at 2:24) turning them all upside down (presenting the alternate stacking challenge) but…
Peg: says “And I can turn them all up.” She proceeds to do so and concludes, “I did it.” (at 3:13).
Episode H:
at ~3:13
Peg: returns to assembly of nesting cups, making two wrong-size insertion attempts. She continues with the verbal commentary of “no’s” when she sees a blockage. She runs into a number of problems;
Bob: says “she apparently has not realized yet that the sinking of one cup completely within another indicates there is an order problem.” GPL disagrees.
Bob: asks “Is it clear to you as it appears to me she doesn’t pay much attention to the color, though it may have something to do with memorizing short sequences.”
Peg: completes stack at 5:15.
Bob: There you are. What do you think.”
Peg: “That makes my big city.”
Episode I:
at ~5:15
Bob: tries to interest Peg in “another kind of big city you can build with the same cups,” but she is resistant and keeps them to herself, again distributing the cups for re-executing the inclusion activity.
Unclear dialogue *****. (ends at 6:25)
Themes
Interplay
This video panel culminates the triumph of order, and Peggy’s mastery of physical inclusion relations with those familiar toys of years’ long-standing. Her achievement was exactly as Mimi Sinclair had projected, around the end of her third year. How precisely she developed in this line is one of the core themes of the Infant Peggy Study. It will be the first exploration in respect of space and the relations of objects in space.

Panel P146, Order Triumphs.

3V0733.1

3V0733.01 [chin hurts] Variation anchor, abetted by questioning. (1/25/80)

Peggy somehow hurt herself, and when asked what was the matter,
replied, ‘Chin hurts.’ A few days previously, as I was changing her
diaper, I became aware that she was talking away.
P : ‘…neck….hurt (or hurts, I could not notice)…’
G : ‘Your neck hurts, sweety ?’ I asked.
P : ‘No…tomac’
G : Oh, your stomach hurts ?
P : Knee
At first, I was confused by this litany, thinking her neck hurt, then
assuming her locution meant ‘I hurt my neck at some time in the past
(or my neck hurt…) But it seems that this was an example of variation
on an anchor, abetted by my questioning to find if anything was
seriously wrong. Gretchen.

3V0733.2

3V0733.02 More variations. (1/25/80)

Over the past few days, Peggy has been using the words ‘many’ and
‘more’ in various contexts. Example : sitting on my lap, Peggy looked
up at the picture illustrating Chaucer’s Canterbury pilgrims, and
remarked
P : ‘Many (unclear).’
G : What ? What did you say ?
P : Many horses.
G : Oh yes, Many horses.
Another day or so later at dinner, Peg said ‘More potatoes’ (a request
for another helping).

3V0733.3

3V7033.03 More variations and pause deletions; noun-noun structure (1/25/80)

Peggy, Gretchen, and I drove over to Clinton to retrieve Scurry from the
kennel. As we rode along, I tried explaining my views of the
importance of Peggy’s variations and pause deletions. Peggy was more
interested in my furry gloves. She asked for them (they were on the
dash). ‘Gloves…on ?’ I responded ‘Gloves off.’ She tried again,
‘Gloves…on ?’ Again I refused, ‘Gloves off’ I can’t certainly recall her
deleting the pause here, but she may finally have done it, but I cite this
more as an example of how this simple social interchange can both
precede anchoring with variation and enhance the gradual development
of pause deletion.

When the dog was retrieved and came into the car, Peggy petted her,
and I asked ‘How’s our old poochie poo ?’ Peggy responded
‘Name…dog.’ This is significant both as an example of a known general
noun applied appropriately (similar to her use and exemplification of
the term ‘joke’ a few days previously) and as an example of a noun-
noun structure, different from her more common verb-noun pattern of
her speech.

Driving home, Peggy provided another example of variation. Something
dropped from the dash — perhaps a glove. Peg remarked ‘fall
down…fall sleep.’

3V0736.1

3V0736.01 [pick oo up] (1/28/80)

Peggy has begun to say “Pick oo up” instead of or in addition to just
“up.” Over the subsequent days, victim of a bad cold, Peggy used this
phrase constantly. Recently Bob noted that he heard her say ”Pick up.”
dropping out the “oo” [you]. Peggy probably developed this phrase
originally from hearing us reply “Shall I pick you up?” or “Do you want
me to pick you up?” Gretchen.

3V0736.2

3V0736.02 Culdy’s mouse; apparent possessive (1/28/80)

Peggy has been of late forcing the dog’s toy on her, will she or not.
With Scurry in the other room, Peggy picked up the toy and very
distinctly and precisely named it as “Culdy’s mouse” then ran off to put
it on her. This is an uncontestable use of a form that has all the
surface features of a possessive; the form was distinctly applied on an
object to a person quite correctly.

3V0738.1

3V0738.01 “Up on the bed”; [pocket…in…into pocket] (1/30/80)

In our bedroom today, Peggy came over to the bed and said “Up on the
bed.” [she wanted to get up.]

Later she was playing with her “gold” buttons in the pocket of my
sweater. She put them back, remarking “Pocket…in…into pocket…” Gretchen.

3V0742.1

3V0742.01 Partly pause-deleted phrases (2/3/80)

Peggy produced several phrases today exhibiting compaction by pause
deletion – but such [is] not universal: Three examples:
“toys… love-em” (at toy box)
“Culdy…like-it.” (that mouse again)
“find-it”
The last has been common in Peggy’s recent speech and might be considered
a precursor of the development of compound structure.

3V0743.1

3V0743.01 “Scurry” for the first time. (2/4/80)

Today Peggy said “Scurry” for the first observed time. (getting her
mouse, identifying owner.) Gretchen.

3V0743.2

3V0743.02 More already compacted phrases; an invention (2/4/80)

Peggy drinks a lot of juice, and it’s not surprising that she should
produce a two-element phrase such as “good juice.” One could argue
this was purely imitative by her merely taking cognizance of part of the
question she heard frequently, “Is that good juice?/Is that good juice?”
Less likely to fall under an imitative explanation is the phrase “black
tape” produced when she brought me my electrician’s tape. (No
mention of it had been made in the immediately preceding context.)
Least likely of all is the descriptions “Snoopy head” which Peggy applied
appropriately to a Beagle-head from her make-an-animal set of toys.
These phrases showed no pauses between them.

3V0744.1

3V0744.01 A catalog of the kinds of things Peggy says (2/24/80)

2/5 “mama, look…did it.”
2/6 (Asking for cookies, and being told the wrapper was empty and the cookies all gone.) “Robby’s eat it.”
2/7 “Lookit…Lookit that”
2/9 (Rummaging around the bookshelf) Where Pony is ? [ie a book called “Little Black, a Pony.”]
2/11 “Me did it.’
2/12 (Watching Miriam put food on her – Peggy’s- plate: “More noo-noo… More noo-noo… More noo-noo plate.”
ca 2/19 (Coming down Stepstone Hill, Peggy wanted to stop at Gordy’s):
“Pop-pop…get (or give) pop-pop me!…get me pop-pop.
2/23 (unhappy, wanting to get up on the bed: “Pick me up.” (She has also offered me a toy or book,
remarking “Pick oo up.” (referring to the object). Gretchen.

3V0747.1

3V0747.01 [Culdy me… bite]; very non-standard form (2/8/80)

Peggy came to me after playing with the dog and said “Bite hand”
I asked, “Who?” She replied, “Culdy me…bite.”

It’s obvious Peggy meant the dog bit her. The agent and patient were
named with no intervening pauses. I consider this a clear, natural
example of a very non-standard form (for English).

3V0747.2

3V0747.02 Pause deletion in practice (2/8/80)

Peggy plays with a knitted pocket book belonging to her sister Miriam.
She walked past my place at the table, talking to herself:
Mimi…pocket-book… Mimi pocket-book.” This example argues that
Peggy is constructing compact phrases “purposefully” by deleting
pauses which occur naturally in a “commentary” mode of expression
wherein she names what she attends to.

3V0747.3

3V0747.03 Number/temporal names (2/8/80)

Miriam tells me she has asked Peggy the time and Peggy responded
“eleven.” The answer was not correct but was significant as a number
name. Peggy may have been imitating a specific response heard from
some one else in response to the same question.

Miriam asked again of Peggy, in my hearing, the time. Peggy responded
“Eleventeen.” This is clearly a made up number name from appropriate
kinds of elements.m

3V0748.1

3V0748.01 [Where pony is ?] (2/9/80)

Peggy’s favorite books are now about a pony, Little Black. It is kept on
a shelf with another fifty or more books. when Peggy wants a specific
book read, she usually carries it to her reader and says “read…some-
name.” She has referred to missing favorites. “Bridge?…read Bridge ?”
is a request to read “London Bridge is Falling Down.” she wanted me to
read about Little Black today but couldn’t find the book at first. She
became a little frantic and started to whine “where Pony is ?

The meaning is obvious from the context. The expression is telegraphic
and the structure of the utterance non-standard.

3V0749.1

3V0749.01 Words and Numbers; primary roots of discrimination (2/10/80)

Miriam and Peggy play with my yardstick a lot (a free one from a local
hardware store, it has the measure and advertisements on it). Miriam
marches around with it on her shoulder: “hup, two, three, four; hup…”
Peggy marches too, “hup, two, three; hup, two, three.”

Today she LOOKED at the yardstick, then pointing at the symbols as she
clambered along it, said ( in pointing at the numbers) “eleventeen” and
at the words “Peggy Lawler.”

What this means is that she is interpreting alpha-numeric symbols
already — in a very non-standard and idiosyncratic way — but she is
reading the symbol strings as meaningful already.

3V0754.1

3V0754.01 [Robby offa chair] (2/15/80)

Robby was given a chair by his great grandmother when he was 2.
It was handed down to Miriam and now to Peggy, but he still feels
privileged to sit on it (though much too big).

Peggy asserts the chair is hers (after all, she is the only one of an
appropriate size for it). When Robby sat on it today, she became very
upset and, near tears, commended “Robby, offa chair!” The sense of
what she meant is very clear. How can one explain the surface features?

3V0755.1

3V0755.01 [offa Daddy] (2/16/80)

Peggy sat in my lap and was squirming. “Do you want to get down?”
I asked. She said, “offa Daddy,” as she clambered down from my lap.

3V0755.2

3V0755.02 Many Lawlers (2/16/80)

Riding in the car, Peggy spoke to herself up in her car seat. “Peggy
Lawler. Mimi Lawler. Robby Lawler. Mommy Lawler. Daddy Lawler.”

3V0757.2

3V0757.02 [Where Mimi is ?] (2/8/80)

Miriam often plays with Peggy, but she was away from home for several
hours today sledding. At one point Peggy asked, “Where Mimi is ?” and
we told her. This is another example of non-standard sentence order in
a question like “Where Pony is?”

3V0762.1

3V0762.01 [Robby… com-po-si-tion] (2/23 /80)

(Bob calls to Robby from the living room -> no answer). Peggy says
“Robby” and heads into the living room. I expect her to summon
Robby, but as she heads out of the room she calls “com-pos-si-tion.”
(She has heard us reminding the two older children about writing
compositions for their journals and for Calvert School Tests.)

3V0764.1

3V0764.01 Many Lawlers: extended family (2/25/80)

going through the catalog again:
P: “Peggy Lawler… Mimi Lawler…Tree Lawler…”
G: “Tree Lawler?”
P: “Out there (gesturing).”
Gretchen.

3V0765.1

3V0765.01 [I’m cold]? (2/26/80)

Out for a walk on a windy day. We did not get very far when Peggy
remarked, “I’m [or am – unclear] cold.”
G: “Shall we go back home and get warm ?”
P: “Yep.”
Gretchen.

3V0765.2

3V0765.02 [Hurts…neck] (2/26/80)

“Hurts…neck” Gretchen.

3V0767.1

3V0767.01 Don’t rub your eyes”; imitation as analysis by synthesis (2/28/80)

So, Gretchen reminded me. I sat in my chair with Peggy and one of her
books on my lap. (My eyes get itchy from allergic reactions and I rub
them excessively, almost without noticing). Peggy turned, looked at me
(after I had stopped) and said “/do/ruhb/aiz/.” Why?

What is THIS imitation all about ? Is it analysis by synthesis, i.e. does it
help Peggy understand another’s meaning to try producing her own
first interpretation ?
A weaker help: does producing her own copy confirm for her ability to
make sense of what she hears ?
A NOVEL idea: could this imitation of speech be useful in elaborating
and/or exercising the new network of verbal links abuilding between
disparate frames that are object and event oriented ?
How can I answer these questions ?

3V0769.1

3V0769.01 Miriam’s Pillow; idea: function words as pause fillers (3/1/80)

Because in the worst periods of her allergies, Miriam slept better sitting
up, we bought her a king sized pillow. It is longer than Peggy is tall and
wider. Thus Peggy finds it perfect for falling on. Miriam tried to take it
away while Peggy was falling on it, “Mimi pillow.” Peggy responded. ”
Peggy pillow,” and, after a pause, “My pillow.” This is clear evidence
for her understanding of at least the first person possessive pronoun.

When Robby tried to lay with his head on the pillow, Peggy lifted that
corner and said, “Sleep on boards.” — referring to our oak flooring.

Late in the day, she passed me at the table and said, “Get the pillow//
Down the bed.” (Where // = pause.) Here we have two separated
phrases as before we had separated words. What is the quality of “the”
in these phrases ? First, she said something that could easily be
interpreted as “the” — because it was unaccented and the vowel was at
least close to a schwa. The initial consonant ? I believe it was /th/ in
both cases. What is the function of “the” in these utterances ? I can
see it as a pause-filler of no semantic significance but permitting a
continuous flow of speech which connects related elements together as
the caesura between “pillow” and “down” separates them.
We should attend closely to such utterances.

3V0769.2

3V0769.02 “cake tastes good” (3/1/80)

Spontaneous sentence apropos a piece of cheesecake left over from my birthday.

3V0769.3

3V0769.03 Reading Hop on Pop (3/1/80)

Peggy sat reading in the middle of the study floor. Was Gretchen sitting
with her ? I can’t recall., but I know she was least in the room. Peggy
turned the first page, pointed at the picture and said, “Up // Pup.”
(This is the large letter text of the page.) On other pages, she “read”
other names and words, singly and in multi-word phrases: Song, Black;
All, Tall; No, Pat. She also produced her own interpretations. Where
three dogs fell out of a tub into the water, she noted, “Dog wet //
Soggy.” Peggy passed by the picture of three fish in a tree. I asked her
“What do you think of that fish in the tree?” She replied, “How bees ?”

The significance of this observation is that Peggy is obviously relating
uttered words and phrases to the specific pictures of her book “Hop on
Pop.” Some of this relating is associational, e.g. the name “Black” with
the specific character (she doesn’t know well color names). The role
of semantics is clearly evident in her interpretation of the “wet dogs”
picture. It is also probably implicated in her ‘reading’ of “No, Pat” and
“Up // Pup.” This applies even more strongly to her reply “How bees?”
(An idiosyncratic production instead of “How can that be?”)

3V0769.4

3V0769.04 Contrast: reading Cat in the Hat (3/1/80)

I read this to Peggy for the first time today. It was very difficult to keep
her interested in any specific page long enough for me to read aloud
the relatively extensive text on each page. Realizing early that this was
a problem, I decided to see how far I could carry a straight forward
reading. I just barely managed — by using all of the tricks picked up by
being a father for ten years, pointing at the objects, verbal emphasis,
preventing her turning pages, etc. So “Hop on Pop” is a book of
pictures with words. “Cat in the Hat” is a storey book with pictures.
The episodic character of “Hop on Pop” is not only no draw back for
Peggy, she is clearly insensitive to, uninterested in, any extended story.

3V0771.1

3V0771.01 Reflexive reference: [me do it self] (3/3/80)

Going upstairs “Somebody broke oo gate.” [True]
Objecting to being carried. “Me do it self.”

3V0771.2

3V0771.02 Scurry and cookies

Peggy all too often shares her food with the dog, sometimes on
purpose, sometimes not so. Today she took some cookies from a little
easter basket made by Miriam and carried them over to Scurry. she
then said (and repeated 3 more times) “Scurry eat some.”

Here Gretchen censured Peggy, telling her that cookies are not good for dogs
and she should not give them to her. Peggy concluded the interchange
with her own affirmation, “Scurry good dog.”

3V0772.1

3V0772.01 Plan for Reading list: March 3rd-April 4th,1980

record located in notes near August 28, 1980:
This reading list will be first set up as a spread sheet then modified for
insertion in this file and copied to it. (roughly 160 entries)

not clear that this plan was ever completed. (RWL, March 2011)

3V0773.1

3V0773.01 “Nice poo” (3/5/80)

Miriam reports – on explaining that she had to stop play to go to the
bathroom, Peggy said (as M. left) ‘Nice poo, Mimi.’

3V0774.1

3V0774.01 Jokes as communication protocols (3/6/80)

Miriam has been telling (surely in Peggy’s hearing) a knock-knock :
M : Knock knock.
V : Who’s there ?
M : Tim.
V : Tim who ?
M : Tim – ber !

At supper this evening, Peggy said :
P : knock knock.
B : Who’s there ?
P : Him.
B : Him who ?
P : laughter.

We continued, because Peggy kept initiating the jokes. Miriam repeated
her ‘Timber’ joke. And then Peggy, apparently sensing something was
required after ‘Him who ?’ continued in her final recitation to say :
B : Him who ?
P : After me.
This phrase is from a picture in Hop on Pop. The one where a tiger is
biting a boy (text : ‘He is after me.’)

I believe Peggy was imitating Miriam’s joke — but misapprehended it —
then recognizing something was amiss — went on to try repairing her
imitation by making what sense of it she could. I believe this is a
beautiful example of the particular process. As it connects back to her
initial learning of the KK script, this incident argues we should continue
attending to Peggy’s joke appreciation — because if we follow it all the
way through her initial ‘getting’ of a joke in a mature form, we will
have a primary example of how a child learns a socially embedded
communication protocol.

3V0774.2

3V0774.02 Keeping warm (3/6-8/80)

While the older children clustered around the stove in the morning,
Peggy picked up her ‘Bear Hug’ from the floor across the room and
brought it to the stove. Holding it up and close, she said, ‘Bear keep
warm.’

Two days later, before an open fire in our sitting room fireplace, Peggy
sat in a nearby (fire, sic) chair and spoke as I rearranged the burning
logs. ‘Wood on fire,’ I heard her say., Gretchen interpreted it differently
either as ‘Watch the fire’ or ‘Watch oo fire.’

3V0775.2

3V0775.02 Repetition and further specification (3/7/80)

Gretchen mentioned hearing Peggy do a most interesting thing : she
first said, ‘ Lookit table.’ then immediately ‘repeated’ the phrase more
precisely as ‘Look at the table.’

This is an example of the incremental standardization of speech
production under her own direction (this may be well compared to her
development of the KK joke just noted). There is a production,
internally criticized by more specific comprehension knowledge,
followed by a reproduction reflecting the current ‘state of
competence.’

There is no reason to believe production should lag far behind
competence when the toddler’s major concern is elaborating a new
mind control structure based on labels — the symbolic interconnection
of previously disparate frames — this is especially true when there is a
critical process monitoring production.

3V0775.3

3V0775.03 Who’s that? — syngnostic use (3/7780)

Peggy does not distinguish Who and What. consequently, when
requesting the name of an object she asks, ‘Who’s that?’ Today she
held up a toy, plastic doll and asked “Who’s that?” “You mean your dolly?’
I responded. She then became more specific, pointing with her
finger on the bonnet, ‘Who’s that ?’ I understood then and answered,
‘That’s a hat.’ She pointed under the doll’s chin and asked, ‘who’s that?’
‘That’s a neckerchief.’

I speculate Peggy asks ‘who’s that ?’ in imitation of the frequent
question we put to her while reading.

This same dolly was the object around which another possible example
of repetition/further specification occurred. Peggy turned it over.
‘dolly…tie…back.’ (The doll’s apron is tied at the back.) Then pointing
at the tie, Peggy repeated ‘Dolly tie, that.’

3V0776.2

3V0776.02 An inference (3/8/80)

Peggy ran from the dining room to me in the living room. Holding out
her hand to me (I responded to take whatever it might be), Peggy
dropped coins in my hand. She said, ‘Money on table. Somebody left it.’

Not only is this a two-sentence speech act, it also exhibits an inference
(Notice the pause that once would have separated ‘Money…table’ is
gone, moved to the position as a sentence stop. With the intra-phrase
pauses deleted, it is now possible to relate through language, across an
un-namable pause of semantic relation, two clusters of ideas that
earlier would have been too unstructured, too fragmentary, to be
pulled together as a semantic whole.

Confer here Archibald MacLeish’s presentational discussion of Chinese
poetry in his book ‘Poetry and Experience.’

3V0777.1

3V0777.01 Analogies — their incomprehension; deep role in cognition. (3/9/80)

Peggy woke me at midnight, she had a stuffy nose and was crying for
her Mommy. we played in the sitting room, she in my lap. Pointing to
a foxy, she said ‘Get foxy.’ I replied ‘Too far away.’ She continued ‘Like
a fader.’ Surprised, I asked, ‘He’s like a father ?’
P : ‘Yes. Big. ?
B : ‘Because he’s so big ?’
P : ‘Yes.’
I picked up things within reach, a rabbit and a toy gun. Peggy stuffed
the rabbit between her legs and the chair, then she picked up the gun.
After a few rotations and trigger pulls, she pointed to a small protrusion
about the handle ‘Who’s that ?’ (I didn’t answer.) She continued, ‘Tail ?’
Then picking up the rabbit by the tail, she said, ‘Rabbit have tail…(of
the gun, pointing again) Have uh tail ?’

This is as clear an example as one could wish to have of Peggy’s using
her part knowledge of one thing (animals) to analyze what the parts
are of things of a different sort. This is not a superficial simile, it is a
deep use of analogy to understand what’s what.

3V0780.1

3V0780.01 Conversation at dinner: multiple “thanks” (3/12/80)

Peggy dropped her fork and Robby retrieved it.
P: Robby get fork.”
G: Yes, Robby got the fork for you. Peggy, you should say ‘thank you.’
P. Thank oo.
R: You’re welcome.
P. /dats./ [Thanks, idiosyncratic]
R. You’re welcome.
Gretchen.

3V0780.2

3V0780.02 Inquiry: first normal interrogative [where’s Cat a Hat ?] (3/12/80)

Peggy: “Read ‘Cat a Hat.’… Where’s Cat a Hat’?”
The first time I’ve heard her use the normal interrogative instead of “XX is where ?”
She has also begun to say “Why?” all the time.
Gretchen.

3V0780.3

3V0780.03 Shoe Daddy off: clear example of non-standard syntax (3/12/80)

Peggy said this as I removed my shoes. It is perfectly clear she was
describing what I did and it is also clear what she meant, “Daddy is
taking off his shoe.” the syntax appears quite non-standard.

3V0781.1

3V0781.01 “Peggy Lawler” – what symbols mean to her (3/13/80)

Ever since Miriam’s gift of the Grover Book (wherein she wrote PEGGY
LAWLER on the inside cover to show ownership), Peggy has interpreted
any group of letters as meaning “Peggy Lawler.” She distinguishes
(more or less) between four things: letters, seen as individuals; pictures
in books; words in books (seen en masse); and individual words,
standing out from the mass, as interpreted as meaning “Peggy Lawler”
(at least hopefully so named by her).

3V0785.1

3V0785.01 New toys (3/17/80)

Peggy discovered the rest of the set of stacking cups, neatly stacked.
She carefully separated then, setting them down in an irregular row.
Then she put them back into a stack, apparently in random order so
that some nested and others did not. She repeated the taking apart and
re-stacking. The third time she appeared to be trying to make them
nest, and when a cup she tried was too big, she would remove it and try
another. The fourth time, she put little ones inside big ones and made
about three or four pairs of nesting cups. She did not attempt to make
these pairs fit together any further.
Gretchen.

3V0785.2

3V0785.02 Girl go in moto-cycle (3/17/80)

This refers to the Fisher Price doll in a motor cycle.)

3V0785.3

3V0785.03 Letters in cards (3/17/80)

The “school desk” set I gave Peggy in P112 (or P111) has card board
cards as part. These cards have cut outs for letter insertion for the
letters in the names of objects printed on them. Peggy has been fitting
letters into those slots.

3/22/80 Peggy has been fitting the magnetic letters in the plastic
hollow tray, trying to fit specific letters into their appropriate holes.

3V0785.4

3V0785.04 Me dumb dog — a joke by Peggy (3/17/80)

Gretchen was getting Robby from scouts. I was in bed early. Miriam
put Peggy in her crib because she would not watch TV with her. Peggy
was most unhappy. I rose from bed, rescued her, and we crawled
under the covers together. After a little talk about pillows and Peggy
struggling to remove her socks, I said “Daddy love Peggy.”
P: “Why?” She asked, as she has in response to every word spoken to
her in the past several weeks.

I had heard her address these words to her toy elephant as she sat him
on her potty, “he good friend.” I tried to answer her “Why?”
B: “Peggy good friend.”
P: “No (she laughed), “Me dumb dog.”

The joke is clear if one knows that Peggy has lately referred to Scurry
as a “dumb dog,” even though she loves Scurry. she also loves her toy
elephant, but she clearly in this joke makes the distinction between the
animate and inanimate objects of love.

3V0787.1

3V0787.01 Knock-knock variations (3/19/80)

Sitting with Peggy and Miriam after dinner. somehow the phrase knock knock came up..
M&P: Knock knock
M: knock knock
P: Who’s there ?
M. Tim
P: Tim who ? (the first time I heard her make the appropriate response at this point)
M. Timber !

– a second go:
M. knock knock
P: Who’s there ?
M: Orange.
P: (slowly, after a pause) What orange ?
Miriam tried again and got the same response.

– another try:
M: knock knock
P: Who’s there ?
M. Telephone.
P: In the kitchen.

Finally, Miriam went back to her original success:
M: knock knock
P: Who’s there ?
M: Him.
P: Him who ?
M: Him is after me. (Hop on Pop reference)